Tag Archives: pilipino

Poro Point (Poem)

Standard

By Alejandro Hufana

The rocks still roots the water
Tauter than that the boy int he channel
That marks where men-of-war should enter
And avoid the shallows of the turtle
The lighthouse eye puts out. Today’s communion

Is in the pulpit of the machine
Now when all owes it religion
What adventure had the aborigine?
One make-up moment to be emperor
IN this haunted hamlet on the coast -Fishers foam-furrow the equator
TO homage at a trading post.

Now when divinity is frail
Between the radar poles and the wishing well.
To beat the mind to a bell
In bretheren’s bones with the sunken sail.

As if from rising bottom, sound of sand
Spills out cargo and conqueror
On seven sights of land
Far from either rock or bouy
Like a prayer’s amen, and ahoy!
The brief bed of he whirling whore,
The sunbath, the pinpointed star,
And the native full five-strings deep in his guitar
Sermons how to suffer.

Now back to feed the lamps their fuel
While the rock still roots the water
Tauter than that the bouy in the channel.

Advertisements

You ask me how much I Love You

Standard

By Benito F. Reyes

You ask me how much I love you,
Ah, lovely inquisitive lips!
You would want to fathom the ocean
And scale the infinite blue above us.

Shall I count the sands on the seashore,
Or pick the numberless stars of heaven
Like some sweet woodland blossoms?

Ask the bold eagle of the air
If he could soar the ends of the distance,
Or the worm of the ground if it could crawl
Down to the very core of the earth.

And you ask me how much I love you,
Ah lovely inquisitive lips!
You would want to fathom the ocean
And scale the infinitive blue above us.

Read! read the answer in my eyes
And in the quiverless muteness of my lips.
For there are things that are voiceless
And would be told only in the silence!

 

*I love this poem. Very deep. 🙂

To a Lost One

Standard

By Angela Manalang – Gloria

I shall haunt you, O my lost one as the twilight
Haunts a reed-entangled trail
And your dreams will linger strangely with
the music
Of a phantom lover’s tale.

You shall not forget for I am past forgetting.
I shall come to you again
With the starlight, and the scent of wild champacas,
And the melody of rain.
You shall not forget, Dusk will peer into your
Window, tragic-eyed and still,
And unbidden, startle you into remembrance
With its hand upon the sill.

Philippine Traditions in Celebrating Christmas

Standard

People are not usually aware that December 25th is not the actual birth of Jesus Christ. In fact, most historians believe he was likely born in the spring because of the Bible’s description of shepherds herding animals.
It was in the 4th Century, when the Roman Catholic Church decided to recognize Jesus’ birth as an official holiday. Pope Julius I chose December 25th for the “Feast of Nativity.” Now Christmas Day is celebrated as a major festival and public holiday in most countries of the world, even in many whose populations are not majority Christian.

Philippines is one of the predominantly catholic country in Asia. So Filipinos has a lot of known traditions and cultures in uniquely celebrating Christmas holidays.

Traditional Christmas here in the Philippines are:

  1. “Simbang gabi”  or mass of the rooster
    – a mass held before dawn that starts on December 16 up to the nine-day novena.
  2. Parol or star lanterns
    customized star lanterns that are commonly made from bamboo sticks.
  3. the Noche Buena
    – a family feasts that takes place after midnight. It is an open house celebration for Filipino after attending  “simbang gabi”.
  4. Carolers
    – a group of singers that visit houses with musical instruments to serenade. Carolers must have different and unique strategies to stand out in a crowd. Money are given to them after they serenade.
  5. “Panunuluyan”
    – This is a re-enactment of the Holy Couple’s journey to Bethlehem and portrays the lack of hospitality they encountered along the way.

Philippines is a truly unique and full cultured country. I am glad to be born here. 🙂

Happy Holidays!

How to Spot a Filipino

Standard

You point with your lips.
You eat using your hands and have it down to a technique!
Your other piece of luggage is a balikbayan box.
You nod your head upwards to greet someone.
You put your foot up on your chair and rest your elbow on your knee while eating.
You use a rock to scrub yourself in the bath or shower.
You have to kiss your relatives on the cheek as soon as you enter the room.
You’re standing next to eight big boxes at the airport.
You collect items from hotels or restaurants “for souvenir’s sake.”
Your house has a distinctive aroma.
You smile for no reason.
You flirt by having a foolish grin on your face while raising your eyebrows repeatedly.
You go to a department store and try to bargain the prices.
You use an umbrella for shade on hot summer days.
You scratch your head when you don’t know the answer.
You never eat the last morsel of food on the table.
You go bowling
You play pusoy & mah jong
You find dried up morsels of rice stuck to your shirt.
You prefer to sit in the shade instead of basking in the sun.
You add an unwarranted “H” to your name (i.e., “Jhun,” “Bhoy,” or “Rhon.”)
You put your hands together in front of you as if to make a path and say “excuse, excuse” when you pass in between people or in front of the TV.
Your middle name is your mother’s maiden name.
You like everything that’s imported or “state-side.”
You check the labels on clothes to see where it was made.
You hang your clothes out to dry.
You are perfectly comfortable in a squatting position with your elbows resting on your knees.
You consistently arrive 30 minutes late for all events.
You always offer food to all your visitors.

Read the rest of this entry